Deliverables

Download here the Deliverable 2.1 DEDALUS toolkit for workshops 

Download here the Deliverable 2.2 DEDALUS workshops stories

 

Selection of good practices of sport based solutions and sustainable sport infrastructures

The following good practices have been identified during the workshops and considered during the experimental design workshop

An innovative and green project in Turkey

The Istanbul Fatih Municipality started to eliminate the threat to life and property and to minimize the risks of fire and uncontrolled destruction; a total of 676 derelict buildings in Fatih’s 49 neighbourhoods were demolished within the “clean area green environment” project.
At the same time, 3,500 tons of greenhouse gas emissions were prevented. Green areas increased by 31% by transforming the empty lands that emerged due to demolition into parks, gardens, sports and social facilities.

Facilities of Alternative Sports: Equestrian Centre by Carlos Castanheira and Clara Bastai

When considering a sports building, we always imagine some superstructure with thousands of seating capacity, where a large crowd gathers to watch or participate in a sport. But sports are much more than that, which opens up a universe of possibilities for sports facility design.
The sports facilities mentioned below are amongst the world’s most inventive sports facility designs, ranging from timber-clad archery halls to stunning futuristic skate parks. It’s the peak of alternative sporting arenas and your inspiration for the day.
The Equestrian Centre was built near Cabo do Mundo beach in Leça da Palmeira, a coastal district north of Porto, by studio founders Carlos Castanheira and Clara Bastai. Each structure has a different purpose at the centre: two are utilised as indoor arenas, the third is a stable block, and the fourth is housing riding facilities. Outdoor training spaces for jumping and racing and grazing paddocks complement the two indoor arenas. The sprint track — a narrow, bending strip of ground that runs around the park’s southern boundary – is overlooked by a lake and a swimming pool.

A nation’s garden for Ankara

By the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change, on unused vacant land in the Capital Ankara (structural, biodiversity, naturalness, health, safety, positive social relations and relations), green areas are increased, and a healthy and safe environment is created by bringing together sports and green spaces.
A nation’s garden was built for its creation and maintenance. Healthy, adequate and balanced nutrition, physical activity and city life are targeted for people who will protect and improve their mental and social health—12.800 meters of bicycle path and 12.800 meters of walking path in an area of 633,000 m2.

Facilities of Alternative Sports: Boxing Club and Archery Hall by FT Architects

When considering a sports building, we always imagine some superstructure with thousands of seating capacity, where a large crowd gathers to watch or participate in a sport. But sports are much more than that, which opens up a universe of possibilities for sports facility design.
The sports facilities mentioned below are amongst the world’s most inventive sports facility designs, ranging from timber-clad archery halls to stunning futuristic skate parks.
It’s the peak of alternative sporting arenas and your inspiration for the day. The Equestrian Centre was built near Cabo do Mundo beach in Leça da Palmeira, a coastal district north of Porto, by studio founders Carlos Castanheira and Clara Bastai. Each structure has a different purpose at the centre: two are utilised as indoor arenas, the third is a stable block, and the fourth is housing riding facilities. Outdoor training spaces for jumping and racing and grazing paddocks complement the two indoor arenas. The sprint track — a narrow, bending strip of ground that runs around the park’s southern boundary – is overlooked by a lake and a swimming pool.

Restarting sports activities in Turkey: handball​

After the earthquakes that took place in Turkey on February 6, some sports fields were damaged. New sports fields were built in tents, and container cities were set up to help people overcome the earthquake shock.
Handball fields were created in these places by the Turkish Handball Federation, representing a solid good practice enabling children to overcome the adverse effects of the earthquake through sports.

Facilities of Alternative Sports: WMS Boathouse by Studio Gang Architects

Chicago-based Studio Gang Architects designed a boathouse on the Chicago River’s northern bank with a repetitive roofline meant to mimic the alternating motions of a rower’s arm movements. The building’s jagged roof profile was developed by tracking the time-lapse movements of rowing.
It is made up of structural roof trusses that alternate between M and upside-down V forms. The building’s façade is coated in a silvery grey combination of slate tiles and zinc panels. Timber lines the interior spaces and extends outside the structure to wrap the insides of balconies and the undersides of overhanging eaves.

Good practice in Portugal: the Pavillon of Lousada

The Municipal Pavilion of Lousada is a sports facility equipped with all the conditions for practising the following sports: basketball, handball, futsal, volleyball, hockey, roller hockey and skating.
This infrastructure consists of a playing field (floating floor) and respective benches with a capacity for about 800 spectators.
Also, it has room for modalities such as ballet, gymnastics maintenance, and karate, among other modalities. It also has another room for developing table tennis and an artificial climbing wall. Besides the sports facilities, this infrastructure also supports cultural events such as exhibitions, fashion shows, concerts and other events. Recently, this space was subject to work, having improved the roof and the floor to improve the conditions for sports practice.

Facilities of Alternative Sports: StreetDome by CEBRA and Glifberg+Lykke

CEBRA and Glifberg+Lykke designed the Street Dome, a skate and street sports park and cultural complex in Haderslev, Denmark. Street Dome is a significant urban arena for street sports, social engagement, and activities. CEBRA’s “Igloo”, or dome-shaped sports hall, features street basketball, skateboarding, parkour, and climbing facilities.
The skate park designed by Glifberg+Lykke is divided into three sections: a street plaza, a transition-based flow area, and a playground. The dome merges well with the surrounding concrete landscape on the outside. It has wood panels and translucent glass on the interior.

A world-class state-of-the-art stadium: Brisbane, Australia

With a capacity of over 52,500 seats, the Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane, Australia allows wide range of uses, including: – Rugby league, – Rugby union, – Soccer, – Concerts, – Boxing. Developed on an area of ​​7.42 hectares, the stadium hosts 25 refreshment points, 34 points of sale and 4 bars for members.

With the objective to reduce the environmental impact, the stadium has adopted several sustainable measures, namely

  • rainwater collection from the roof with a storage capacity of 1.1 million litres inside the stadium, for the irrigation of the fields and the washing the stadium, about 50 mm of rain is enough to fill all four tanks and supply the stadium with enough water to irrigate the playing field for about 12 weeks;
  • managed organic waste stream so it deviates king as much as possible from the landfill all the organic materials generated on site, in favor of recycling other productive uses;
  • replacement of sports lights and lighting operational daily with LED with arming progressive of the spaces in the System Stadium Dyna;
  • light for manage consumption energy more efficiently.

BBVA Stadium in Texas, an example of energy efficiency

Rugby stadium of BBVA Stadium (United States), an American multi-purpose stadium located in Houston, Texas. The stadium results from combined pledges of $35.50 million from the City of Houston and $60 million from the Houston Dynamo. The community agreed to pay half of the land in exchange for the possibility of owning the stadium after both completion dates in May 2012. Work started in autumn 2009. The stadium has a capacity of seating 22,039; it is designed to accommodate international soccer, lacrosse, rugby and concerts.

Architecturally, the stadium features a multifaceted network façade of expanded metal with orange polycarbonate inputs. The architect of the stadium, Christopher Lee of Populous, has designed an urban soccer stadium perfect: tight, atmospheric and intimate. The stadium has been classified as a silver tier by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, an energetic US efficiency classification system. The stadium received the award for its innovative construction and sustainable design. Note results included transfer in discharge of 86.85% of construction waste generated on-site, reduction of 41% water consumption from installing high-energy toilets, reduction of energy consumption by 20.41%, the use of 98.42% of wood as a base of building materials from certified forests, and provide privileged parking spaces for low-emission and low-consumption vehicles fuel.

Millennium stadium, a good practice model in Galles

The Millennium Stadium opened in June 1999, and nowadays, it has a capacity of 74,500 fans. It is considered an avant-garde place thanks to the fully retractable roof. The stadium got the UEFA 5-star classification and has hosted matches for two World Cups, including the 1999 final. The installation of a divider sheet system in 2005 allowed the stadium to be adapted for concerts and exhibitions.

The Millennium Stadium project began in 1994 to redevelop the National Stadium of Wales and revitalise west Cardiff. Research has been done on operating systems, methods and resources to identify areas that need improvement and have been made the following changes:

– upgrading of heating, cooling and ventilation systems;

– Installation of computer-controlled lighting systems, which they turn on the lights in specific work areas rather than on a whole floor to save energy; offers better lighting quality, ensuring better visibility for players and spectators;

– Introduction of LED lighting to reduce electricity consumption and emissions of heat, thus improving air conditioning levels throughout hospitality lounge;

– Plant operations limited to the days of the event only to reduce expenses maintenance and energy consumption;

– Collecting rainwater under the palletized recycle flowerbeds pitch the water.

A model for sustainability, the Wellington Regional stadium

Wellington Regional Stadium is a multipurpose sports venue located at Wellington is the capital city of New Zealand. Started in 1998 to replace the old Athletic Park, it stands near the city port and was inaugurated in January 2000, becoming immediately the internal plant of the rugby province of Wellington.

The singularity lies in the project of the roof: in fact Wellington a windy city, Holmes Consulting tested some in the wind tunnel lightweight concrete solutions for the top in order to propose a solution engineering that presented minimal resistance to gusts and avoided loads to the structure and dangerous sail effects.

Most of the building was prefabricated: about 4,000 concrete modules lightweight were manufactured in Otaki and New Plymouth and trucked to the capital for about 18,000 m³ of material. The steel used in total, between the concrete reinforcement and the mounting and support structures, was about 4300 t.

The roof structure is wholly suspended inside the stadium. There are no pylons or support pilings to impede in whole or in part the view of the playing field; the lighting system consists of 392 projectors of 2000w each, 280 of which were installed on four mounted trusses on the roof (70 for trellis) and 112 along the roof’s edge. It has a video surveillance system and data analysis to improve performance and player safety. The high-definition cameras record the game and the movements of the players. This data is analysed using advanced algorithms to identify patterns and trends, providing Valuable information for coaches and players. The exterior is made with a streaked reflective metallic coating horizontally and has slit openings in a diagonal pattern which allow natural light to enter the atrium.

The playing surface is a hybrid turf called Desso GrassMaster: consists of natural grass with artificial fibres woven into the surface for provide excellent stability and durability. Wellington Regional Stadium is committed to sustainability and has implemented various initiatives to reduce its environmental impact. These include the use of renewable energy sources, the reduction of the consumption of water and the recycling of waste materials. An additional $7 million is expected to be spent on the stadium over the next year to liven up the atrium, upgrade the technology to allow Wi-Fi access to users and replace the turf.

Brooklyn Boulders by Arrowstreet

Brooklyn Boulders is a unique communal space where individuals may work and interact while participating in rock climbing and fitness. The hybrid rock climbing, health, and co-working facilities were designed by Brooklyn Boulders Chief Development Officer Chris Ryan. Apart from world-class climbing walls, the Brooklyn Boulders community space features yoga classes, personal fitness and weight training, cafe and lounge areas, saunas, showers, and locker rooms, as well as a collaborative workspace with tables, chairs, stand-up desks, and plenty of room for meetings and presentations.

Kiteboarding and Windsurfing Center by DO Architects and Aketuri Architektai

The kiteboarding and windsurfing center in Svencele, Lithuania, was designed and built by DO Architects and Aketuri Architektai in collaboration. The facility comprises 37 temporary containers that have been meticulously structured into a complex of structures that house various functional sections. On the waterfront side, the container complex includes surf shops and schools, as well as a cafe and a stage terrace, and on the inland side, housing and leisure areas. The kiteboarding and windsurfing facility is only one component of a larger proposal to redevelop 30 hectares of an abandoned duck farm into a residential and recreational complex.

Cultural and Sports Center by Architektonické Štúdio Atrium

In the residential neighbourhood of Nad Jazerom in Koice, Slovakia, architectural studio Atrium converted an ancient heat exchanger into a public, cultural, and sports complex. The heat exchanger was one of several tiny thermal stations used to supply heat to nearby housing projects. Atrium created a geometric design and a jagged, projecting exterior for this heat exchanger, one side of which is a rock-climbing wall that visitors may climb. The structure contains five linked stories that have been converted into exhibition spaces, as well as a rooftop with four huge trees and a tourist lounge.

Equestrian Center by Francisco Mangado

The Elite Equestrian Center, designed by Francisco Mangado, is an attractive facility in Navarra, Spain, in the heart of Ultzama Valley. The site, the centre’s purpose as an equestrian facility specialized in dressage and horse boarding, and the surrounding buildings’ architectural presence all influenced the centre’s design, structure, and organization. The equestrian facility’s features include steel sheet-covered walls and oakwood used in the interiors and vertical cladding, pavement, and window frames. The roof is also uniform throughout the complex, sloping appropriately along with the various areas or facilities.

Sports and Arts Facilities in Denmark

Gammel Hellerup High School asked the Danish architecture firm headed by Bjarke Ingels to design several new facilities for its campus in Hellerup, north of Copenhagen. It was created in the school’s courtyard and dug five metres below ground to keep it adjacent to the existing classroom structure. It was then topped off with an arched roof to form a new humped landscape, ensuring no outside space was lost. The new building is two stories tall. One is completely submerged, while the other rises from the ground in front of the roof of the sports hall. Its roof extends the football pitch’s surface to create a constructed slope where spectators can sit and watch the games.

Tournesol Swimming Pool by Urbane Kultur

Bernard Schoeller built the Tournesol Pool, a futuristic structure with a dome that can be opened to transform the interior into an outdoor environment. Aside from keeping the building’s appearance, the Urbane Kultur addition added new mixed dressing rooms, remodelled internal and exterior claddings, and improved the building’s thermal efficiency. The previous roof’s design – 36 metallic arches, one-third of which is retractable – is preserved in this renovation. On the other hand, the building’s outside envelope has been transformed into a black rubber covering that significantly increases its overall thermal performance. A radial pattern of skylights runs around the complex, each with two layers of translucent glass.